Welcome to the NASHTU Website

The National Association of State Highway and Transportation Unions (NASHTU) is dedicated to ensuring that federal transportation dollars are spent on cost-effective, safe projects that serve the public interest. NASHTU is comprised of 38 unions and associations representing hundreds of thousands of state and locally employed transportation engineers, construction managers and inspectors, technical workers and related public servants from throughout the United States.

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NASHTU Conference Set for June 24-26, 2019 – Save the Date!  

NASHTU’s 20th Annual Conference will take place June 24-26, 2019 at the Liaison Capitol Hill Hotel in Washington D.C. (415 New Jersey Avenue, NW).

At the 2019 conference, we will share how NASHTU affiliates are adapting to the U.S. Supreme Court Janus decision and discuss successful membership recruitment strategies.  We will also be advocating for NASHTU’s priorities including cost comparison prior to outsourcing and public inspection for federally-funded transportation projects.

Members of Congress, transportation leaders, good government experts, and others will again be invited to share their latest insights.  In addition, the conference will feature informative panels on transportation funding, the status of efforts to reauthorize the FAST Act, labor issues, and other items of interest.

NASHTU has secured a special room rate at the Liaison Capitol Hill Hotel of $249 per night (single/double occupancy).  The hotel will also honor the special room rate for up to two days prior to and post conference, subject to hotel availability.  To book your room, please go to www.liaisoncapitolhill.com or call 888/513-7445.  NASHTU’s Group ID is JUNE19.

As always, if you have suggestions for speakers, panels, or interesting subjects for the conference, please pass them on.


NASHTU Notes

November 9, 2018

How Transportation Funding Fared at the Ballot Box

Citylab, a city-centric online publication, this week provided a comprehensive look at how statewide and local transportation ballot measures fared across the nation on Election Day.

In a huge win for transportation advocates, California voters defeated Proposition 6, which would have repealed the recent gas tax and vehicle fee increases that pay for $5 billion per year in road and bridge improvements.  Voters in Connecticut and Louisiana were successful in passing “lockbox measures,” which ensure that transportation funds are only used for transportation purposes.  Maine voters successfully passed a $106 million bond measure for transportation infrastructure.  The article also notes that Michigan’s initiative to legalize recreational marijuana, which passed comfortably, includes a 10 percent excise tax on marijuana purchases, some of which would go to the state’s transportation fund.

Unfortunately, other statewide initiatives to generate new transportation revenue failed to pass, including measures in Washington, Missouri and Colorado.

Another positive, according to the article, was that most of the local transportation funding measures were successful, including regional and countywide efforts in New Mexico, Florida, Virginia, and Texas.

Read the full article in Citylab.


April 24, 2018

2018 NASHTU Conference a Smashing Success!

By any measure, NASHTU’s 19th Annual Conference, held April 16 through 18, was among the most productive and interesting conferences in our history.

NASHTU conference attendees heard from three Senators including Sen. Tom Carper (D-DE), the Ranking Democrat on the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee (EPW), Sen. Ben Cardin (D-MD), the Ranking Democrat on the Senate EPW Transportation and Infrastructure Subcommittee, and Senator Jeff Merkley (D-OR), who is also a member of the EPW Committee.  In addition, we also heard from four members of the House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee, including the Highways and Transit Subcommittee Chair Sam Graves (R-MO), and Reps. Rodney Davis (R-IL), Jared Huffman (D-CA), and Alan Lowenthal (D-CA).

On the Tuesday afternoon of the conference, NASHTU members had the opportunity to meet with their state’s Congressional delegation and advocate NASHTU’s legislative priorities including increased transportation funding and limiting outsourcing of transportation services on federally funded transportation projects.  That evening, NASHTU hosted a well-attended Congressional Reception that included 12 Members of Congress and dozens of congressional staff members.
The three-day conference also included many informative panels and presentations on transportation funding alternatives, upcoming legislative and regulatory battles, labor issues, and multiple other topics of interest.

In the coming weeks, NASHTU will be posting proceedings, photos, and some of the presentations of the 2018 conference on our website at www.nashtu.us.  For additional information, please contact us at nashtu@nashtu.us.


News Stories

Democrats eye push for infrastructure plan if they retake House — Democrats are planning to pursue a major U.S. transportation and infrastructure measure if they retake control of the U.S. House in the Nov. 6 midterm elections, but the same question that helped stall Donald Trump’s trillion-dollar initiative remains: How would it be funded? — The Daily World — October 30, 2018

U.S. Supreme Court Hears Arguments In ‘Landmark’ Yakama Nation Gas Tax Case — Whether a Northwest Native tribe can legally transport goods and services across state lines is at the heart of arguments that will be presented to the U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday. In 1855, the Yakama Nation signed a treaty with the United States that expressly allows for free travel across state and tribal boundaries. This clause convinced the Yakama Nation that the owner of the Cougar Den gas station on the Yakama Reservation is legally allowed to transport gasoline from Oregon and sell it on the reservation without paying state taxes. In March, the Washington state Supreme Court agreed. But Washington state’s Department of Licensing still disagrees. — Emily Schwing for KUOW 97.9 — October 29, 2018

Rhetoric fuels debate over prospect of tolls’ return to Connecticut — It seems as if Connecticut’s been debating the reinstatement of highway tolls since soon after their removal in the 1980s. The current election season has been no exception, with Democratic and Republican candidates for the state legislature voicing positions adopted by their respective camps, the former generally supportive of “electronic tolls” and the latter dismissing them as “just another tax.” In state Senate debates sponsored by The Day, the sides differed over whether the state would lose federal funding if it implemented tolls on its interstate highways. Federal officials have confirmed that it would not. — Brian Hallenbeck for The Day — October 27, 2018